Is your CEO driving a Clown-car?

ceo clown carIf you read this post on Linkedin  and its associated comments, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the CEO drives a clown-car to work and that the rest of the exec team spend all day throwing custard pies at each other 

In summary, the post mentions research that looked at  117 projects. Of those projects, 80% of the projects suggested by senior managers failed while 80% of those suggested by mid-managers succeeded.

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Corona virus: An opportunity for better collaboration

 

 corona image

I'm scared that someone I care about will get ill. I'm fascinated to see how fast it's spread. I'm frustrated at people panic-buying toilet paper. I'm terrified of being stuck at home with the kids for 2 months. I'm simply fed up of the whole thing.

Whatever your reaction to the novel corona virus, COVID 19, relatively few people are looking at it and saying, "I'm excited - this is a real opportunity for us to improve some core processes!"

But that's just what it is.

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Tetris, Teleportation and Your Portfolio

This may seem like an odd question, but when did you last play Tetris?

Capacity and Utilization with TetrisBelieve it or not, we can use Tetris to demonstrate something crucial about project portfolios. This should be a fun blog - you’ll get to play Tetris, after all -  but there’s also a little bit of maths buried in there… all in the name of delivering more projects successfully!

We’re going to look at why taking on too many projects causes so many problems - I mean really dig in to it - and we’ll see what you can do to solve the problem.

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How to Deal with Inconsistent Comparisons in Analytic Hierarchy Process

“I am depressed. I entered my pairwise comparisons but the AHP software claims that they are inconsistent. I have no idea what this means. I was trying to change some comparisons but I think I messed it up even more. Please help me. I know Analytic Hierarchy Process is a powerful tool, but right now, I’m in a real mess!”

If you have ever felt this way, this article is for you. You will find here tips on how to deal with inconsistent comparisons. Don’t worry, it’s not difficult.

Ok, first things first…

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3 Steps to Reduce the Number of Comparisons in Analytic Hierarchy Process

Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) is so time consuming! I don’t have time to make all these comparisons. I can’t expect my colleagues to spend so much time making judgments. Is there a way to make it quicker, please?

No worries. Help is on the way.

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When (Not) to Use Pairwise Comparisons in Analytic Hierarchy Process

Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)without pairwise comparisons? Are you crazy? Is this even possible?

Well, pairwise comparisons are the core mechanism of AHP, the factor that makes it easy to use, and main reason why people love AHP. Yet people sometimes get so wrapped up in pairwise comparison and its elegance that they don’t realize that it sometimes gets in the way. Sometimes, scales are better. So we wrote this article to help you understand when to use each.

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9 Best Practices for Effective Prioritization with Analytic Hierarchy Process

 

If there is something every organization has, it is a long list of "must-have" project requests. The process of prioritizing these projects is usually very political and ineffective.

We’ve seen cases where 30% of the selected projects were obsolete within a few months – they were the wrong projects.

So how do you fix it? One of ways to address this issue is Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). In this article we hope to give you a picture of what we see as best practice.

This is just a sub-set of the information contained in our Ultimate Guide to Project Prioritization.

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5 Must-Have Features for Effective and Intuitive AHP Software

Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) is one of the most popular decision making methodologies. It is intuitive and easy to use. However, if you try to use it without dedicated software, the underlying math can be challenging, especially as the number of participants, alternatives and criteria increases.

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